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Federalist 45 provides us with critical information regarding the history, purpose, and constitutional definition, necessary authority, and the delineation of Federalism.

Federalist 45: James Madison - Bob Alley

Federalist 45 - The Bryan/College Station Tea Party

theweakerparty - 2305 - Federalist 45 and Federalism

Federalist 45 provides us with critical information regarding the history, purpose, and constitutional definition, necessary authority, and the delineation of Federalism.

Founders Online: The Federalist Number 45, [26 January] 1788

Federalist 45 provides us with critical information regarding the history, purpose, and constitutional definition, necessary authority, and the delineation of Federalism.

The Avalon Project : Federalist No 45
James Madison Explaining the new federal government's very limited powers in Federalist 45.

Federalist No. 45 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It is important to keep in mind that under the Constitution the people are sovereign. “The people delegate to government only so much power as they think it prudent for government to exercise; they reserve to themselves all the powers and rights that are not expressly granted to the federal or state or local governments,” wrote Kirk. In reassuring that the true intent of the Constitution was to limit power, James Madison, the principle architect of the Constitution, wrote in Federalist Paper 45: “The powers delegated by the proposed constitution to the federal government are few and defined. Those which remain in the state governments, are numerous and indefinite.”

Madison made the clearest case for the Constitution's limited nature in Federalist 45

46 in The Founding Fathers's The Federalist Papers (1787-1789)

Madison’s argument in Federalist 45 was further illustrated when the Constitution was amended by the 10th Amendment to the Constitution, which explicitly states: “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.”

Federalist 45 states that the powers of the federal government are, few and defined

Federalist Papers: FEDERALIST No. 45 - Founding Fathers